Swansea Open 2019

 

A small selection of this year’s crop……..

 

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Pocket Remains: Archive three. Heather Parnell

 

Periodic Table – Exhibition OYB

 

 

‘The Periodic Table’ was an installation by Nigel Talbot who specialises in working with salvaged material. In this instance the materials were drawn from the University of South Wales’ sculpture workshop, which was being decommissioned. The exhibition takes a lead from the Italian writer and chemist Primo Levi, who uses the chemical elements as a metaphor for life experience and the human condition. Both the book and exhibition celebrate the magic of transforming base elements into new matter, fulfilling the ambition of the alchemists but not in the way they imagined. The exhibition included contributions from invited artists, staff, alumni and students of creative writing who were commissioned to respond in kind. October – December 2019.

Oriel Myrddin wire weekend

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In mid November I went to Oriel Myrddin for another workshop weekend, this time led by Julia Griffiths Jones.  Julia’s practice involves using wire techniques in response to stitched textiles, so this was the starting point for us all. I learned how to use the spot welder – such a brilliant piece of kit!

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Overnight I did some homework, making wire outlines of some of my pocket tissues and connected these together on the second day.  The potential for drawing in space or using wire in conjunction with pocket objects is apparent. All very interesting …..

and the diversity of responses by other participants was truly inspiring…

 

Thankyou Oriel Myrddin for this nourishing season – more please!

 

Oriel Myrddin Indigo weekend

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In early November I returned to Oriel Myrddin to attend a workshop on Indigo dying, another process with it’s origins in Japan.  I’ve approached each of these workshops with an interest in expanding my understanding of material processes that may be useful in my practice in the long term. This weekend led by Jeanette Orell was a lot of fun.

Just like printmaking, there was the big reveal as material was unpicked, unpacked and hung out to dry.

 

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Oriel Myrddin quilting weekend

Workshop

In October I attended a weekend workshop led by artist Angela Maddock . This was the first of three weekends exploring different responses to textiles. This weekend focused on learning about quilting and Sashiko, a Japanese stitch technique.  I took along two deconstructed garments (with pockets) to reconstruct over the course of the weekend.

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Catherine, Director at Oriel Myrddin provided a great setting for the workshops and wonderful food, supplemented by Angela who brought a delicious home made cake to start the days. It was great working with the participants, such a nice bunch of people. Suffice to say, my piece is a work in progress……..

 

ART CHECK-IN from the other.

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Group exhibition. Taneri Showroom, Seto, Japan. September – October 2019.

(Aichi Trienniel Art Festival period). Curator: Masahiro Kawanaka.

 

Artists: Akihisa Kawano, Aya Shimamoto, Ayako Matsumura, Caroline McGonigal, Christian Psyk, Heather Parnell, Joseph Calleja, K Kough, Keiji Tsutsumi, Lada Wilson, Masahiro Kawanaka, Michael Craik, Miku Tsuchiya, Niall Stevenson, Odorico, Peter Clouth, Shoko Katsu, Sonja Tintelnot.

Project Japan 2019 – So long!

Kaoru Higashi, me and Ritsuwo Kanno

I packed up my prints and latex tests and said a fond farewell to everyone at Atelier Outotsu on Friday 16th August. It’s been a warm and welcoming place to work, learn, meet some talented artists and nurture new friendships.

Thankyou Ritsuwo Kanno and Kaori Higashi for the opportunity to come to Atelier Outotsu, you have been extremely kind and generous.

 

Thankyou also to Wales Arts International for supporting this research trip.

 

For Paul Hazel’s response to the trip read here – it’s a good read and a different adventure!

Watch this space for what comes next!

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